ARTS ENTREPRENEURSHIP & TECHNOLOGY: THE ART OF BUSINESS AND BUSINESS OF ART
The Hero's Odyssey in Arts Entrepreneurship & Technology:
A Renaissance in the Classical Liberal Arts & Free Market Economics: Ideals in Innovation

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The Arts
THE HERO'S ODYSSEY IN ARTS
ENTREPRENEURSHIP
"Make your passion your profession & render the precepts of classical economics real in living ventures."
"The greatest scientists are always artists as well." --Albert Einstein

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The Battle for the Soul of Capitalism Watch John C. Bogle's HJEF Keynote: VANGUARD: SAGA OF HEROES: Remarks by John C. Bogle, Founder, The Vanguard Group before Dr. Elliot McGucken's AE&T Class

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Art of Business & Business of Art: Let art inspire the MBA
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Hero's Odyssey Marketing(TM), Hero's Odyssey Branding(TM), Hero's Odyssey Entrepreneurship(TM).
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Homer's Odyssey

"Honor makes a great part of the reward of all honorable professions."
--Adam Smith's
Wealth of Nations

Joseph Campbell's
The Hero With A Thousand Faces

The Triangle Business Journal reports:

What do you get when you combine an interest in the arts with an interest in entrepreneurial ventures and an interest in cutting-edge technology?

Dr. Elliot McGucken at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill says the result is someone he calls an artistic entrepreneur. Thus, he's received a grant from the Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative to launch a class called Artistic Entrepreneurship.

Known as "Dr. E" to his students, McGucken teaches physics and programming and has published a poetry book, a novel, a collection of essays, several scientific articles and - huh? - poetry in The Wall Street Journal.

Since 1995, he's run an online site called jollyroger.com that pays homage to the "Great Books" and serves as a forum for those who worship excellence in literature. As for the new class, McGucken says it "will invite writers, artists, directors, producers, musicians, business majors, and computer programmers to work together in building artistic ventures."

"It'd be great to build a couple hip artistic ventures in our own backyard," McGucken tells Biz. "Why let New York and L.A. have all the fun?"


Ecce deus fortior me, qui veniens dominabitur michi. --Dante
If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -- J.R.R. Tolkien
ARTISTIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP & TECHNOLOGY
Teresea Ciulla of Entrepreneur Magazine blogs, "Can you actually make your passion your profession? According to Dr. Elliot McGucken, a professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (and now Pepperdine University), who's teaching the university's first "Artistic Entrepreneurship & Technology 101" class, the answer just may be yes. McGucken's class, which is comprised of a group of 45 students majoring in law, business, art, computer science, journalism and music, focuses on teaching students about creating value over just making money, about letting their higher ideals guide the bottom line. After all, as McGucken says, "Successful companies aren't successful because they make money--they're successful because they create value." Class projects range from a classical music video to a hip hop curriculum and textbook to an online art gallery to a freshman's record label that's signed more than ten bands to a social network being programmed by three computer science majors. Students are seeing that to the degree they succeed in creating useful art and ventures, they'll be able to support their passions with a profitable business. And isn't that what we're all really striving for? To find an excitement in our work in order to beat back the dullness of the typical 9-to-5 routine? Looks like McGucken's found a way to inspire a new generation of artistically minded entrepreneurs to follow their passions--and make a living."

Reviving the Moral Premise in Hollywood and the Heartland: on Main Street and Wall Street: in Screenplays and Business Plans.

"The classic system--owner's capitalism, had been based on a dedication to serving the interests of the corporation's owners in maximizing return on their capital investment. But a new system developed--manager's capitalism--in which, Pfaff wrote, "The corporation came to be run to profit its managers, in complicity if not consiracy with accountants and managers of other corporations." --John C. Bogle, Founder and Former Chairman of The Vanguard Group, The Battle for The Soul of Capitalism

"There's a difference between us. You think the people of this land exist to provide you with position. I think your position exists to provide those people with freedom. And I go to make sure that they have it." --William Wallace in Braveheart, by Randall Wallace

"Man should not be in the service of society, society should be in the service of man. When man is in the service of scoiety, you have a monster state, and that's what is threatening the world at this minute." --Joseph Campbell, author of Hero With a Thousand Faces

The act of entrepreneurship is based upon the common moral premise that forms the foundation of the above three quotes--individuals embarking on a hero's odyssey so as to better serve their peers.

Einstein wrote, "The highest principles for our aspirations and judgments are given to us in the Jewish-Christian religious tradition. It is a very high goal which, with our weak powers, we can reach only very inadequately, but which gives a sure foundation to our aspirations and valuations. If one were to take that goal out of its religious form and look merely at its purely human side, one might state it perhaps thus: free and responsible development of the individual, so that he may place his powers freely and gladly in the service of all mankind.

There is no room in this for the divinization of a nation, of a class, let alone of an individual. Are we not all children of one father, as it is said in religious language? Indeed, even the divinization of humanity, as an abstract totality, would not be in the spirit of that ideal. It is only to the individual that a soul is given. And the high destiny of the individual is to serve rather than to rule, or to impose himself in any other way." --Albert Einstein, Einstein's Ideas and Opinions, pp.41 - 49.


Hero's Odyssey Economics

Economist and professor Cyril Morong has been conducting research on the relationship between economics and mythology for over fifteen years. Check out Cyril's definitive paper, The Creative-Destroyers: Are Entrepreneurs Mythological Heroes? (Presented at the annual meetings of the Western Economic Association, July 1992.)

Here is Cyril's Abstract: The psychology of entrepreneurship can be better understood by comparing it to the hero's adventure (as well as the trickster's) In mythology because myths are often seen as symbolic representations of the psyche. The hero and the entrepreneur are found to be similar in their respective adventures, a three part sequence of separation from the community, initiation into new creative powers and a return to the community with a boon for his fellow citizens. Both are creative, curious, energetic risk takers who are guided by mentors. Entrepreneurship can be seen as a manifestation of a universal human psychological condition, the desire for individual creativity.


VISUAL ARTS
Photography
Sculpture
Painting
DRAMATIC ARTS
Acting
Directing
Producing
MOTION PICTURES
Film
Movies
Documentaries
TV
Production Studio
Animation
MUSIC
Bands
Record Labels
Distribution
Booking
Production Studio
Non-profit
Management
PROGRAMMING
Linux / Apache / MYSQL / PHP / PERL / PYTHON / Postnuke / Wordpress / PHPNuke / Oscommerce /Gallery / Mambo / Joomla TALENT AGENCIES
Acting
Music
Literary
MODELING
Modeling Agency
FASHION
Design
Runway
Branding
WRITING
Screenwriting
Novels
Nonfiction
Poetry
Publishing
BLOGS/BLOGGING
VIDEO GAMES
Game Design
Game Production
Game Storytelling
Games & Movies
SOCIAL NETWORKS
Friendsters
MySpaces
Facebooks
YOUR VENTURE!
social network - fashion - publishing - photography - music - film - brand
Law & Art
US Copyright Office
US Patent & Trademark Office
Creative Commons
Public Knowledge
Nolo "Do it Yourself" Law
Incorporate
The Great Books
Open Source DRM
Business & Art
Art & Business of Movies
Music Business Solutions
This Business of Music
Photography Business
Open Source Business Plan
Technology
This class will let you easily leverage cutting-edge technology to realize your venture. Optimum blends of open source and proprietary solutions will be encouraged. Technology will include:
Open Source Content Management Systems
Ipod
bittorrent
Microsoft Digital Rights Management
eCommerce
Billing Systems
Photoshop
Final Cut Pro
GarageBand
ProTools
AE Profile
Bob Young founded Red Hat Linux, and he currently leads Lulu--a Raleigh venture that empowers indy artists--writers, photographers, musicians, painters, creators, and more! Download Bob's free book on the philosophy and business of Open Source here.
About Dr. E
Dr. E is an artistic entrepreneur. He founded jollyroger.com in 1995, and now runs over 30 sites. He presented Authena Open Source DRM/CMS at the Harvard Law School OSCOM, and 22surf was accepted to the Zurich OSCOM. Both Authena and 22surf are aimed at helping indie artists/creators. Dr. E received a B.A. in physics from Princeton and a Ph.D. in physics from UNC Chapel Hill where his dissertation on an artifical retina for the blind received several NSF grants and a Merrill Lynch Innovations Award. The retina-chip research appeared in publications including Popular Science and Business Week, and the project continues to this day. The New York Times deemed jollyroger.com "simply unprecedented," adding that the site "teems with discussion, the kind that goes well beyond freshman lit 101." The Los Angeles Times referred to the classical portal as "a lavish virtual community known as The Jolly Roger." Dr. E has published four books including two novels and a poetry collection.
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Odyssey / Contact
This class will be a odyssey towards realizing your dreams. Hopefully many of you will continue this odyssey beyond the class. Contact Dr. Elliot McGucken for more information.
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The Power of Hero's Odyssey Mythology in Entrepreneurship
by Dr. Elliot McGucken
Sing in me, Muse, and through me tell the story
of that man skilled in all ways of contending...
He saw the townlands,
and learned the minds of many distant men...
and weathered many bitter nights and days
in his deep heart at sea . . .
Striving only to serve his men, and return on home. . .
--Homer's Odyssey as translated by Robert Fitzgerald (1961)

"I'm trying to free your mind, Neo. But I can only show you the door. You're the one that has to walk through it."
--Morpheus, The Matrix

"You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down." -Steve Jobs
"The stock exchange is a poor substitute for the Holy Grail." --Joseph Schumpeter
"Tu ne cede malis sed contra audentior ito." --Virgil's Aeneid (Ludwig von Mises' lifelong motto.)
The New York Times reported, "McGucken's course (Arts Entrepreneurship & Technology 101). . . rests on the principle that those who create art should have the skills to own it, profit from it and protect it. "It's about how to make your passion your profession, your avocation your vocation, and to make this long-term sustainable," he said. --New York Times Small Business
Princeton Club of Southern California: Hero's Odyssey Renaissance Festival: Ideals in Innovation: The Hero's Odyssey Entrepreneurship Festival with Dr. E aims to provide students, artists, and entrepreneurs with the inspiration and tools to make their passions their professions--to protect and profit from their ideas--to take ownership in their careers and creations. This entreprenuership event celebrates the ultimate Renaissance Man--Leonardo da Vinci--while saluting "hero's odyssey mythology" in the realms of screenwriting, videogames, film, academia, and robotics--robots inspired by da Vinci's designs.
Don't Count on It! Reflections on Investment Illusions, Capitalism, "Mutual" Funds, Indexing, Entrepreneurship, Idealism, and Heroes : "Vanguard: Saga of Heroes (Chapter 23) presents a very different interpretation than you might expect from its title. This chapter is based on a lecture I presented to Pepperdine University (CA) students, at the request of Professor Elliot McGucken, as part of his course The Hero's Odyssey in Arts Entrepreneurship & Technology 101. "Dr. E" relies heavily upon such classics as Homer's Odyssey and Dante's Inferno, and honors me by including with these classics my own The Battle for The Soul of Capitalism. This essay focuses on Vanguard's odyssey, a voyage punctuated with challenges, narrow escapes, and ultimate fulfillment. I conlude by urging introspection upon our financial leaders, an idea that failed to get much traction back in 2007 when it might have helped. But these leaders were simply making too much money, taking too much risk, and showing too little concern about the crises then building. . . -p. 436: "It's no mean task to measure up to the high appraisal of my career that has been so generously expressed by Dr. Elliot McGucken. That he has, remarkably, placed my 2005 book, The Battle for the Soul of Capitalism, on the same reading list as The Odyssey--let alone the same planet!--adds even more to my burden in meeting the expectations of those who are aware of this background. . ." --Vanguard, Saga of Heroes, p. 469, Don't Count on It published 2010 by John Wiley & Sons
BusinessWeek Reports: Where Entrepreneurship Connects to the Classics
"Elliot McGucken, a professor of entrepreneurship at Pepperdine University, bemoans that "a lot of schools have dismissed the idea of teaching the great books." In a recent lecture at Pepperdine, McGucken points out that that one lesson of the classics is, "Chance favors the prepared mind. Instead of viewing risk as a bad thing, we can also view it as a good thing."

The classics inspired America's Declaration of Independence, which McGucken sees as an entrepreneurial document. Life has a way of "calling us to adventure," he concludes." --BusinessWeek


Video for Dr. E's upcoming book The Hero's Odyssey Entrepreneurship Code of Honor.
"Go Forth and Make a Name For Yourself in Story" --Homer's Odyssey
Begin Today! Audentes Fortuna Juvat (Fortune Favors the Bold) --Virgil's Aeneid
A great odyssey awaits you, whence you will render your ideals and dreams real in a brave new venture, via the humble, heroic actions definining your business and brand. "Go forth and make a name for yourself in story," the goddess Athena called Odysseus's son Telemachus to adventure in Homer's Odyssey 2800 year ago, and so too is it time for you to join the classic fellowship in your epic hero's odyssey into entrepreneurship.

"Story is the soul of a work," wrote Aristotle in his Poetics, adding, "a story is not about men, but about their actions." Thus action will define your business, as you make a name (your brand) for yourself in story. To exalt the long-term value of your enterprise, it makes sense that you must begin with enduring values--living by The Hero's Odyssey Mythology Code of Honor, for there is no surer ticket to the greater wealth of the hero's odyssey than virtous action, indeed--passage cannot be bought by any other means.

Honor makes a great part of the reward of all honorable professions. --Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations

Albert Einstein: “Money only appeals to selfishness and always tempts its owners irresistibly to abuse it. Can anyone imagine Moses, Jesus, or Gandhi armed with the money-bags of Carnegie?”

Blake Mycoskie of TOM'S SHOES: Stories are the most primitive and purest form of communication. The most enduring and galvanizing ideas and values of our vivilization are embedded in our stories, from those of Homer, whose preliterate epic poems united the Greeks' national spirit, and Virgil, whose poems did the same for the Romans, to those told by Jesus, who used parables to teach his disciples. It seems to be in our genetic makeup to capture our best ideas in stories, to enjoy them, to learn them, and to pass them on to others. . . When you have a memorable story about who you are and what your mission is (telling of the ideals you're rendering real via action, just as Achilles, Odysseus, and Socrates acted to render their soul's ideal real in striving towards arete/excellence), your success no longer depends on how experienced you are or how many degrees you have or who you know. A story transcends boundaries, breaks barriers, and opens doors. It is a key to not only starting a business but also to clarifying your own personal identity and choices. . . A story evokes emotion, and emotion forges a connection. . . (Companies) can no longer rely on simple, straightforward ad campaigns, the kind portrayed on the TV show Mad Men. . . At TOMS, our story is very simple: We make great shoes and give away a pair to a child in need for every pair we sell. . . We spend every day thinking about new ways to spread our story. Blake Mycoskie--Start Something That Matters, Find Your Story, Chapter 2

Jack Bogle: In Enough: True Measures of Money, Business, and Life, I warn of too much cost and not enough value; too much speculation and not enough investment; too much complexity and not enough simplicity; too much counting and not enough trust; too much salesmanship and not enough stewardship; and so on; even too many 21st century values and not enough 18th century values.those values exemplified by the great philosophers of The Age of Reason.men such as Rousseau and Hume and Burke, and Adam Smith, and Tom Paine, who in turn helped shape the minds of our Founding Fathers--especially Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Franklin, and Hamilton. And all of these men, in turn, stood on the shoulders of earlier giants such as Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. (Some of them are likely quoted in the halls you walk here each day. Read their words! Think about them! Gain their wisdom!) It is the values of these giants of Western Civilization that have inspired me.yes, as you well know, the dead teach the living (the motto on Roxbury Latin's crest is mortui vivos docent--the dead teach the living--to speak out on the ethical failings of so many of the leaders of our corporations and our money managers, our regulators and our legislators. What we refer to as Wall Street has become a casino, one in which enormous--but momentary--changes in short-term stock prices are treated as intrinsic reality, rather than ephemeral perception. Think about it. All of today's frenetic trading simply pits one speculator against another, with the only winners being the croupiers--the traders, the brokers, the investment bankers, and the money managers who facilitate those trades. If that undeniable reality reminds you of gambling in Las Vegas, or going to the race track, or hoping to hit the jackpot in the state lottery, well, you see where I'm coming from. The stock market casino has become a giant--and costly--distraction to the serious business of investing. Greed, recklessness, and self-interest ride in the saddle of today's capitalism. . . -- http://www.vanguard.com/bogle_site/sp20090330.html

Henry David Thoreau: The student may read Homer or Aeschylus in the Greek without danger of dissipation or luxuriousness, for it implies that he in some measure emulate their heroes, and consecrate morning hours to their pages. The heroic books, even if printed in the character of our mother tongue, will always be in a language dead to degenerate times; and we must laboriously seek the meaning of each word and line, conjecturing a larger sense than common use permits out of what wisdom and valor and generosity we have. The modern cheap and fertile press, with all its translations, has done little to bring us nearer to the heroic writers of antiquity. They seem as solitary, and the letter in which they are printed as rare and curious, as ever. It is worth the expense of youthful days and costly hours, if you learn only some words of an ancient language, which are raised out of the trivialness of the street, to be perpetual suggestions and provocations. It is not in vain that the farmer remembers and repeats the few Latin words which he has heard. Men sometimes speak as if the study of the classics would at length make way for more modern and practical studies; but the adventurous student will always study classics, in whatever language they may be written and however ancient they may be. For what are the classics but the noblest recorded thoughts of man? They are the only oracles which are not decayed, and there are such answers to the most modern inquiry in them as Delphi and Dodona never gave. We might as well omit to study Nature because she is old. To read well, that is, to read true books in a true spirit, is a noble exercise, and one that will task the reader more than any exercise which the customs of the day esteem. It requires a training such as the athletes underwent, the steady intention almost of the whole life to this object. Books must be read as deliberately and reservedly as they were written. It is not enough even to be able to speak the language of that nation by which they are written, for there is a memorable interval between the spoken and the written language, the language heard and the language read. The one is commonly transitory, a sound, a tongue, a dialect merely, almost brutish, and we learn it unconsciously, like the brutes, of our mothers. . . No wonder that Alexander carried the Iliad with him on his expeditions in a precious casket. A written word is the choicest of relics. It is something at once more intimate with us and more universal than any other work of art. It is the work of art nearest to life itself. It may be translated into every language, and not only be read but actually breathed from all human lips;- not be represented on canvas or in marble only, but be carved out of the breath of life itself. The symbol of an ancient man's thought becomes a modern man's speech. Two thousand summers have imparted to the monuments of Grecian literature, as to her marbles, only a maturer golden and autumnal tint, for they have carried their own serene and celestial atmosphere into all lands to protect them against the corrosion of time. Books are the treasured wealth of the world and the fit inheritance of generations and nations. Books, the oldest and the best, stand naturally and rightfully on the shelves of every cottage. They have no cause of their own to plead, but while they enlighten and sustain the reader his common sense will not refuse them. Their authors are a natural and irresistible aristocracy in every society, and, more than kings or emperors, exert an influence on mankind. When the illiterate and perhaps scornful trader has earned by enterprise and industry his coveted leisure and independence, and is admitted to the circles of wealth and fashion, he turns inevitably at last to those still higher but yet inaccessible circles of intellect and genius, and is sensible only of the imperfection of his culture and the vanity and insufficiency of all his riches, and further proves his good sense by the pains which be takes to secure for his children that intellectual culture whose want he so keenly feels; and thus it is that he becomes the founder of a family. . . The works of the great poets have never yet been read by mankind, for only great poets can read them. --Henry David Thoreau in Walden (All the above passages, and far, far more, appear in Dr. E's book The Hero's Odyssey Entrepreneurship Code of Honor)

In Dr. E's class, we read the classical authors referred to by Tom, Joseph, Jack, and Henry David Thoreau above, and an added benefit, in this era of $200, classics-free textbooks and unprecedented student debt, is that all these epic works may be downloaded for free or purchased in quality-bound editions with scholarly notes and introductions from the world's leading experts--all "for a few dollars more." Too many students are graduating with too much debt these days--debt that shackles them to servitude right when they should be set free to follow their ideals and dreams and render them real in art and entreprneurship. Venture Capitalist Peter Thiel, the founder of Paypal and primary investor in Facebook, also laments the gutting of the classical, epic curriculum accompanied by skyrocketing tuitions:

Openmarket.org: "University administrators are the equivalent of subprime mortgage brokers," notes Facebook investor (and founder of Paypal) Peter Thiel, "selling you a story that you should go into debt massively, that it's not a consumption decision, it.s an investment decision. Actually, no, it's a bad consumption decision. . . Vast amounts of money are spent by American colleges on useless administrators and politically correct indoctrination. For many people, college no longer pays off as an investment.

Forbes.com: For a consummately educated guy, Peter Thiel (paypal founder) is derisive about American colleges and universities. In his view they've become too politically correct (he and David Sacks argued as much in their 1997 book, The Diversity Myth), hobbling the hard sciences as well as the humanities. Schools have created a classic bubble, says Thiel: Inflation-adjusted spending on administration per student jumped 61% between 1993 and 2007, while the number of administrators per 100 students rose 39%, reports the Goldwater Institute. Student debt levels fill Thiel with disgust. "It is pretty much the only form of indentured servitude in the U.S.," he says. . http://www.forbes.com/forbes/2011/0214/features-peter-thiel-social-media-life-after-facebook_5.html

The below works, which are taught less and less as tuitions rise, can all be downloaded for free or purchased for a few dollars. They stand ready to ride alongside you as lifelong friends and mentors in all your ventures, as sure as Thomas Jefferson in his later years again turned to the books he first enjoyed as a teen, writing, "They all fall off, one by one, until we are left with Virgil and Homer, and perhaps Homer alone." Dr. E is working on presenting the best editions/translations of the "Hero's Odyssey Mythology" books he has used in his classes.
1. Homer's Iliad
2. Homer's Odyssey
3. Exodus
4. Virgil's Aeneid
5. Socrates' Apology
6. The Book of Matthew
7. Plato's Repulic
8. Dante's Inferno
9. The Declaration of Independence
10. The Constitution
11. John Milton's Paradise Lost
12. Shakespeare's Hamlet
13. Newton's Principia
14. Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations and Theory of Moral Sentiments
15. The Stoics--Zeno, Diogenes, Cicero, Seneca, Epictetus, Marcus Aurelis
16. Ludwig von Mises' A Theory of Money and Credit
17. F.A. Hayek's The Road to Serfdom
18. Herman Melville's Moby Dick
19. Einstein's The Meaning of Relativity
21. Jack Bogle's The Battle for The Soul of Capitalism, which we have traditionally read alongside Homer's Odyssey at the beginning of every class.
20. Joseph Campbell's The Hero With a Thousand Faces
21. Christopher Vogler's The Writer's Odyssey
22. Guy Kawasaki's The Art of the Start
Wisdom from all the above books (and far, far more) are exalted in Dr. E's The Hero's Odyssey Entrepreneurship Code of Honor.

The transcendant power of Hero's Odyssey Mythology unites a diverse array of endeavors about a common, ideals-based foundation. In studying epic mythology, we are studying the fundamentals of art, law, story, business, poetry, marketing, and branding; we are studying those greater investments which alone endure over time--those overarching ideals and "codes of honor" that make us renaissance men (and women) "skilled in all ways of contending," as Homer described Odysseus; we are studying honor, Arete, virtue, and excellence--the very source of all enduring welath.

Consider the entrepreneur seeking to invest their art and life in the realm of filmmaking-- although screenwriting, forming/ incorporating/ branding a production company, recruiting a cast and crew, securing intellectual property, shooting the film, getting it to market, and publicizing the film are disparate tasks, each chapter is yet united in theme, via the hero's odyssey monomyth. While the technological details (the body) will change, the grander story (the soul) throughout all realms of noble human endeavor remains essentially the same, and thus all ventures may be exalted by the classical ideals found within the "Hero's Odyssey Code of Honor." Thus a most efficient, transcendant, enduring, and all-encompassing education consists not of going into vast debt for a classics-free BA, MBA, JD, & MFA, but in reading the Great Myths--all of which can be downloaded for free or purchased for a few dollars--all of which are exalted in my classes, books, and festivals, from Homer on down.

"Story is the soul of a work," and as story is the unifying theme while the soul is immortal, those who wish to create unified, lasting ventures must begin and end by honoring the soul--that force that presents the ideals and dreams successful entrepreneurs render real via rugged, relentless action, in the humble service of their peers.

As a testament to the overarching ubiquity of mythology in business and art alike, the The Hero's Odyssey Entrepreneurship Festival has hosted both creators of the world's largest financial institutions and movie studios, alongside economists researching the parallels of the heoric monomyth and entrepreneurship. Dr. E's "hero's odyssey" syllabus/outline, conceived of in a class devoted to entrepreneurship, was picked up on the #1 screenwrting blog:

Go Into the Story: The Web's #1 Screenwriting Blog: The Hero's Odyssey as entrepreneurial model? GITS reader and long-time friend Richard Rumble sourced this interesting site that uses Joseph Campbell's theories re The Hero's Odyssey as the basis for teaching entrepreneurship. At first, that might leave you scratching your head, but check out this outline from the website: Artistic Entrepreneurship 101 Outline: (Based on Joseph Campbell's classic Hero With a Thousand Faces) # 1 Structure (based on wikipedia's monomyth): The executive summary of your artistic business venture.
Dr. E's The Hero's Odyssey in Arts Entrepreneurship & Technology
* 1.1 Departure (or Separation): Taking that first step--blog your vision.
o 1.1.1 The Call to Adventure: Artistic passions & dreams
o 1.1.2 Refusal of the Call: Is it practical?
o 1.1.3 Supernatural Aid: Use the force, Luke. The harder you work, the luckier you get.
o 1.1.4 The Crossing of the First Threshold: Business structures / market research
o 1.1.5 The Belly of the Whale: The business plan, raising funds, intellectual property
* 1.2 Initiation: Building the team, incorporating
o 1.2.1 The Road of Trials: Striving toward profitablitity
o 1.2.2 The Meeting with the Goddess: First customers! Early success!
o 1.2.3 Temptation: Seeking short-term profits over long-term wealth.
o 1.2.4 Atonement with the Father: Competing or collaborating with the big guys--the Microsofts and Apples, the Hollywood studios
o 1.2.5 Realizing the core business Apotheosis
o 1.2.6 The Ultimate Boon: Newfound business acumen!
* 1.3 Return: It is all for naught without the road back!
o 1.3.1 Refusal of the Return: Don't lose site of the core business!
o 1.3.2 The Magic Flight: Exit strategy! IPO or selling the company!
o 1.3.3 Rescue from Without: When business competition is your best friend.
o 1.3.4 The Crossing of the Return Threshold: The venture is a success!
o 1.3.5 Master of Two Worlds: You know what it takes--like Richard Branson you can do it again.
o 1.3.6 Freedom to Live: Financial freedom to pursue your dreams!!

"With my students, I make the point that when we conceive of a story, in effect we become a Protagonist in our own story: The writing process. Stumbling upon that initial story concept is like The Call To Adventure. When we type FADE IN, we Cross The First Threshold. As we write, we confront Trials (lose our way, lose our confidence) and Temptations (to quit). And eventually as we get to FADE OUT, we emerge 'victorious' on our own hero's odyssey. Given that, I guess I shouldn't be surprised to find outfits like this using Campbell's theories as business models." --Go Into the Story: The Web's #1 Screenwriting Blog

Every entrepreneurial odyssey follows the Joycean Monomyth's epic themes, from "the call to adventure (seeing the opportunity)," to "the refusal of the call (it would be too risky)", to "meeting the mentor (finding inspiration from Branson/ Jobs/ Bogle/ Achilles/ Odysseus/ Aeneas--those who have gone before)," to "crossing the threshold (Zuckerberg/ Jobs/ Gates dropping out of college)," to "the road of trials (raising funding/ securing IP/ forming the fellowship)," to "the death (Jobs being fired from Apple/ Bogle being fired from the Wellington Fund/ Dante being exiled from Florence/ Aeneas losing it all in the fall of Troy), to "the resurrection (Jobs returning and reviving Apple/ Bogle launching Vanguard/ Dante penning The Divine Comedy in exile/ Aeneas founding Rome), to "the odyssey home (getting products to market--real artists ship!)" with the "ultimate boon (iphone/ ipad/ itunes / Vanguard index fund/ facebook)," and perhaps the greatest reward of all--the elixir of life-enhancing, newfound knowledge and wisdom. Yes--those more heroic entrepreneurs have ever been those who served the higher ideals over the bottom line.

For how "rich" would the world be without science, art, and epic poetry? Without quantum mechanics there would be no computers and thus no twitter nor droid phones nor videogames; without art, philosophy, and epic poetry there would be no liberty, for both Jefferson--liberty's modern poet--and Socrates--the founding grandfather of philosophy and science, referenced Homer as the prime mover. "Poetry is science's true father," stated Goethe, and Jefferson wrote, "as we advance in life, they all fall off, one by one, until we are left with Virgil and Homer, and perhaps Homer alone." And Socrates, in choosing death over dishonor while standing for Truth over politics before the Athenian jury, cited the courage of Achilles in Homer's Iliad, stating that he would never desist from teaching entrepreneurship's fundamental precept, that "virtue does not come from money, but money and every lasting good of man derives from virtue," even if he had to die many times. I shared this passage from Socrates' Apology, which all my classes read to witness how the Homeric hero was internalized as the action was transformed from external odysseys to the higher "battle for the soul"--I shared it with Jack Bogle, and you'll find in his book Enough. Steven Jobs and Sir Richard Branson also agree with Socrates--Jobs stated, "You know, our friends up north (Microsoft) spend over $5 billion a year on R&D and yet these days all they seem to do is try to copy Google and Apple. I guess it's a good example of how money isn't everything," and Sir Richard echoing, "Entrepreneurship isn't about capital; it's about ideas." And so it is that we open a class concerning business, economics, and entrepreneurship by reading Homer alongside Bogle's The Battle for The Soul of Capitalism, for ultimately all these entities are not about the bottom line, but the higher ideals. As Martin Luther King Jr. wrote, "If we are to go forward, we must go back and rediscover those precious values - that all reality hinges on moral foundations and that all reality has spiritual control."

The power of mythology is that it teaches us of the rewards of character and honor--of living for our ideals and dreams while serving our peers. During his keynote at the Hero's Odyssey Entrepreneurship Festival, Jack Bogle stated:

But even as I disclaim the credentials of the hero, of the leader, of the business manager, and even of the entrepreneur, I shamelessly proclaim my credentials as an idealist. Even more, I am an idealist who revels in the values of the Enlightenment and holds high his admiration for the brilliance and the character of the great thinkers, great doers, and great adventurers of the 18th century, men (as it happens, in particular our nation's Founding Fathers) who give birth to our modern world. I confess to being immensely proud of the title of one of the chapters of a biography of me that was published a decade ago: The 18th Century Man
And those 18th century men harbored a vast knowledge of, and love for, the classical myths, as sure as did Einstein, Jospeh Campbell, and George Lucas.

Mythology teaches us that we are not alone in venturing forth on our own as just like Jobs and Bogle only rose to their greater heights after being devastatingly fired at the mid-point pinnacles of their careers, so too did Aeneas only found Rome after he lost everything in the fall of Troy in Virgil's Aeneid and was "forced across the threshold." Just like both Jobs and Bogle found themselves in a dark woods with the familiar path gone, so too does Dante's Divine Comedy open with, "Midway through the odyssey of life, I awoke in a dark woods, with the familiar path gone." Just like 50 Cent rapped, "I gotta make it to heaven, for goin' through hell," Dante's only path to Paradisio was on down through hell, as Virgil stepped forth to mentor him and lead him on, while in Dante's real life, Virgil was Italy's primary poet, literally mentoring Dante's composition. And if Dr. E can teach you anything, it is that Dante, Virgil, Socrates, and Homer all stand ready to mentor you too, as sure as they mentored Plato, Aristotle, Jefferson and the Founding Fathers, Lincoln, T.S. Eliot, and Martin Luther King Jr.

Furthermore, we have not even to risk the adventure alone, for the heroes of all time have gone before us. The labyrinth is thoroughly known. We have only to follow the thread of the hero path, and where we we had thought to find an abomination, we shall find a god. And where we had thought to slay another, we shall slay ourselves. Where we had thought to travel outward, we shall come to the center of our own existence. And where we had thought to be alone, we shall be with all the world. --Joseph Campbell, The Power of Myth & The Hero With a Thousand Faces
Mythology teaches us that obstacles and even failures are but a natural part of the grander story, as Thomas Edison quipped, "I did not fail 1,000 times in trying out wrong filaments for the lightbulb, but I took 1,000 steps towards the right one," just like the greatest of Greeks Odysseus, whose mental facilities and powers of strategerie were matched by his physcial prowess, took twenty years to make it on home, whence he suffered shipwrecks, mutinies, and the anger of Poseidon--the god of the sea--for having blinded the Cyclops--the classic one-eyed bureaucrat who sees not the higher ideals, but only the bottom line. Mythology teaches us the power of staying true to our passions, ideals, and dreams, for Virgil wrote in the Aeneid, "Love conquers all, so let us too surrender to love," and after Jobs was "forced across the threshold" and fired from Apple, he by and by emerged from the darkness of "the belly of the whale," as he realized that he still loved what he did--he yet loved innovation in the technological realms, and being fired had not diminished his love one iota. Ultimately, Jobs' love "conquered all," as he returned to Apple, revived it, and exalted it as the largest company in America. And so it is that our passions and dreams are our greatest assetts, which can never be taken away nor dimished by anyone other than ourselves. Even in the darkness our ideals only glow more brightly, and Jobs', Aeneas', and Bogle's love for idealism, elegant simplicity, and service lead to the founding of Pixar, NEXT (which was integrated into Apple when Jobs returned), Rome, and Vanguard. Long ago, Homer described the entrepreneur in the opening of the Odyssey, which we read at the beginning of every class, alongside Jack Bogle's The Battle for The Soul of Capitalism:
Sing in me, Muse, and through me tell the story
of that man skilled in all ways of contending...
He saw the townlands,
and learned the minds of many distant men...
and weathered many bitter nights and days
in his deep heart at sea . . .
Striving only to serve his men, and return on home. . .
--Homer's Odyssey


Join us on the Arts Entrepreneurship / Hero's Odyssey EntrepreneurshipTM mailing list!
Email: Arts Entrepreneurship & Technology 101
A Renaissance in the Classical Liberal Arts & Economics: Ideals in Innovation
The New York Times reported, "McGucken's course (Arts Entrepreneurship & Technology 101). . . rests on the principle that those who create art should have the skills to own it, profit from it and protect it. "It's about how to make your passion your profession, your avocation your vocation, and to make this long-term sustainable," he said. --New York Times Small Business
The Arts Entrepreneurs Educator's Network: Elliot launched the ArtsEntrepreneurship.com program at UNC Chapel Hill and he is bringing it to Pepperdine University this fall. He received a B.A. in physics from Princeton and a Ph.D. in physics from UNC Chapel Hill where his dissertation on an artificial retina for the blind received several NSF grants and a Merrill Lynch Innovations Award. The retina-chip research appeared in publications including Popular Science and Business Week, and the project continues to this day. Elliot presented Authena Open Source DRM/CMS at the Harvard Law School OSCOM, and 22surf was accepted to the Zurich OSCOM. Both Authena and 22surf are aimed at helping indie artists/creators. He has published four books including two novels and a poetry collection, and blogs on Artistic Entrepreneurship for the Kauffman Foundation. . . Your Spring 2006 course, The 45 Revolver: Artistic Entrepreneurship & Technology 101, is somewhat iconoclastic when compared to other Arts Entrepreneurship courses across the country. Can you briefly describe the class, your course philosophy and the design process?

The Arts Entrepreneur's Educator's Network was created by Dr. Gary Beckman


The Chapel Hill Herald: The class is the first of its kind to incorporate art, technology and business. Student Feedback.
The Hero's Odyssey in Arts Entrepreneurship & Technology: Web 2.0/3.0 Arts Entrepreneurship: Make Your Passion Your "Profession: Dr. E @ SXSW: Don't need no VC when you've got a PC." Not only has technology revolutionized the production and distribution of content, but it has also allowed indie creators to bypass traditional MBAs to define the rights fortheir creations and reap maximum profits. The Constitution states that creators own their creations--so now what's the best way for creators to share, sell, and profit? From Open Source CMS to online incorporation to web 2.0/3.0 to the registering of patents, trademarks, and copyrights, this is a panel for the indie creator. Lecturer: Elliot McGucken Pres, 45Surf
Podcast: Web 2.0 / 3.0 Arts Entrepreneurship: Make Your Passion Your Profession

Video for Dr. E's upcoming book The Hero's Odyssey Entrepreneurship Code of Honor., featuring Dr. E's landscape photorgaphy and the epic wisdom of the Greats.

"THE HERO'S ODYSSEY MYTHOLOGY CODE OF HONOR: It is filled with great pictures, music and interesting and inspiring quotes from many great philosophers and entrepreneurs. He is working on a book on this topic. Elliot created the HERO'S ODYSSEY ENTREPRENEURSHIP FESTIVAL: THE GREAT BOOKS RIDE AGAIN and like me he has related the work of Joseph Campbell on the hero in mythology to entrepreneurship." --Economist Dr. Cyril Morong


I.D.E.A. to Exit: An Entrepreneurial Odyssey: Author and Professor Elliot McGucken, Ph.D. describes the entrepreneurial process to his arts students through an analogy to ancient literature. He describes the first stage of the entrepreneur and that of the classic "hero" story as a odyssey in which the hero, or entrepreneur, "embarks on a quest that requires separation and departure from the familiar world.. . . The entrepreneur moves into the unknown and the unproven. . ." Departure from the familiar is what keeps many from not exploring their entrepreneurial world at all. --Jeffrey Weber: I.D.E.A. to Exit: An Entrepreneurial Odyssey, p. 3, (Published 2010 by Mill City Press)
Jack Bogle: Founder and Former CEO of Vanguard: (Dr. E's) course The Hero's Odyssey in Artistic Entrepreneurship and Technology is an inspiring tribute to the relevance of classical ideals in our modern lives. --Jack Bogle in his book Enough True Measures of Business, Money, and Life, Wiley 2008
Artistic Entrepreneurship - An Interview You Want to Make Time to Hear. As you know, I love my show TalkingPortraits where I get to interview people about all kinds of fascinating topics. . . I just completed editing a show with Dr. Elliot McGucken. This award-winning physicist teaches a course called Artistic Entrepreneurship, and this unique course is a study of Joseph Cambell's Hero's Odyssey applied to an artist's quest to be not only creatively successful but financially successful too. And to approach your success with integrity. So if you've ever hit that wall of "how do I make money doing what I love and do it with passion and integrity," then heed what Elliot has to say. Re-listening to and editing this conversation has brought me new inspiration about my life and my creative goals. This interview is nearly an hour long, so allow yourself some time. Plop it in your iPod or MP3 player and make the time. Trust me on this - you'll feel transformed and uplifted all the way to the end of the talk. http://artsentrepreneurship.com/ Best to you, my friends. Tom
Dr. E's research and patent appliations on social networks, ecommerce, and digital rights management for artists, musicians, and creators are referenced in patents issued to Google (GOOG), IBM (IBM), Sony (SONE), Ebay (EBAY), and other leading entities in the realm of digital media and social networking.
Dr. E wrote the introduction to the 2010 book Disciplining the Arts: Teaching Entrepreneurship in Context by Dr. Gary D. Beckman, published by Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2010

The Hero's Odyssey in Arts Entrepreneurship & Technology seeks to give students, artists, and entrepreneurs the tools to make their passions their professions--to protect and profit from their ideas--to take ownership in their careers and creations. For Adam Smith's invisible hand enriches all when happiness is pursued by artists and innovators--society's natural founts of wealth. Thomas Jefferson eloquently expressed the entrepreneurial premise:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. --The Declaration of Independence

The only clause in the main body of the United States Constitution that mentions "Rights" states the following:

The Congress shall have power to . . . promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries; --The United States Constitution

Couple these two passages together, and one has the moral premise of Artistic Entrepreneurship & Technology. Every student ought be given the tools to create new ventures--to protect their intellectual property, and to pursue and profit from their dreams on their "Hero's Odyssey" into entrepreneurship. For it is along that odyssey that the long-term "wealth of nations" is generated.

"With my students, I make the point that when we conceive of a story, in effect we become a Protagonist in our own story: The writing process. Stumbling upon that initial story concept is like The Call To Adventure. When we type FADE IN, we Cross The First Threshold. As we write, we confront Trials (lose our way, lose our confidence) and Temptations (to quit). And eventually as we get to FADE OUT, we emerge 'victorious' on our own hero's odyssey. Given that, I guess I shouldn't be surprised to find outfits like this using Campbell's theories as business models." --Go Into the Story: The Web's #1 Screenwriting Blog


2010 Webster's Technology Quotations, Facts, and Phrases: Artistic Entrepreneurship & Technology 101 is an open-source course being offered by Dr. Elliot McGucken.
Students Line Up for New Artistic Entrepreneurship Course based on Hero's Odyssey Mythology: When UNC Professor Elliot McGucken put out the call to adventure to "make your passion your profession" with a pilot course for artistic entrepreneurs, students answered. More than 110 students applied for the new course, The Hero's Odyssey in Arts Entrepreneurship and Technology 101. The course, geared towards students with an interest in the intersection between the arts, entrepreneurial ventures and cutting-edge technology, was originally slated for 40 spots, but the overwhelming response triggered an increase in class size. Nearly 50 students are enrolled for the spring semester. Students from a range of creative disciplines--from painting to film production--will develop their artistic vision over the course of the semester. McGucken hopes the course will both inspire artists to pursue their creative passions and give them the practical tools necessary to launch and develop their ventures. "Every artist is an entrepreneur, and every entrepreneur is an artist," explains McGucken. --Univeristy of North Carolina, Chapel Hill News
The University of Cape Town Graduate School of Business: The art of entrepreneurship: There is an increasing attention on the concept of artists as entrepreneurs emerging globally -- artists are becoming more business savvy and finding new ways of sustaining their artistic livelihood. Artists of all kinds are applying their creativity in new ways as businesspeople, and proving that it is possible to leave the "starving artist" notion behind in favour of the "business savvy artist." In the US, the New York Times recently picked up on this trend, and in a feature presented some successful artists changing the game. According to Elliot McGucken who teaches the course Artist Entrepreneurs at the University of North Carolina, the advancement of business skills "rests on the principle that those who create art should have the skills to own it, profit from it and protect it. . . It's about how to make your passion your profession, your avocation your vocation, and to make this long-term sustainable," he says. This business imperative to the world of the arts has become all the more important in the past year, as the recession has not left the art world unscathed . while most of the media attention is on corporates, the plight of the arts is an important issue that needs addressing as well.
The Graphic: Hero's Odyssey Entrepreneurship Festival to Promote Business Creativity: Dr. Elliot McGucken organized the (Hero's Odyssey Entrepreneurship Festival). McGucken teaches a class in artistic entrepreneurship in which Jack Bogle's 2005 book, The Battle for the Soul of Capitalism, is required reading alongside Homer's Odyssey. The theme of a hero's odyssey, therefore, permeated Bogle's presentation. "Classical precepts are the most useful tools throughout life," McGucken said. "Ideals are a great a long-term investment, because they never change." Bogle reached out to students, urging them to pursue an education and to become a citizen characterized by ethics and ideals.
CharlesLaurenFilms.com: The Purpose of Myth: It seems hard to remember, especially when people are feeling down in times like these, but our myths aren't just there so stories can be written using their framework and convention. They aren't there just for entertainment and movies like Star Wars, but they exist in all of our minds and are archetypes because we are supposed to use their ideas to live our lives. . . . Not surprisingly, the heroes in our own world follow the exact same chronology of life events as Frodo or Luke Skywalker. Bill Gates, Richard Branson, Mark Cuban, my buddy Lakshmi Mittal, just about everyone follows the same path. As I thought about this I found a great website (Dr. E's herosodysseyentrepreneurship.org) which outlines the events in an entrepreneur's life and how it relates to the ordeals that the hero must go through on his odyssey, which is in Campbell's book Hero With a Thousand Faces. It was pretty cool to see this structured and in writing! Starting a business in a recession might be the perfect option for a lot of people. Companies aren't expanding into new markets, thus leaving room if you want to sneak into a niche somewhere. In fact, most are retreating into little protective shells so they can stay in business. If you have lost your job, have some savings and have an idea about what you can do to improve the world, maybe you should consider taking the Left Hand Path and starting your own company! If you do, here is what you can expect! The site: HerosOdysseyEntrepreneurship.org --Charles Lauren Films
Don't Count on It! Reflections on Investment Illusions, Capitalism, "Mutual" Funds, Indexing, Entrepreneurship, Idealism, and Heroes : "Vanguard: Saga of Heroes (Chapter 23) presents a very different interpretation than you might expect from its title. This chapter is based on a lecture I presented to Pepperdine University (CA) students, at the request of Professor Elliot McGucken, as part of his course The Hero's Odyssey in Arts Entrepreneurship & Technology 101. "Dr. E" relies heavily upon such classics as Homer's Odyssey and Dante's Inferno, and honors me by including with these classics my own The Battle for The Soul of Capitalism. This essay focuses on Vanguard's odyssey, a voyage punctuated with challenges, narrow escapes, and ultimate fulfillment. I conlude by urging introspection upon our financial leaders, an idea that failed to get much traction back in 2007 when it might have helped. But these leaders were simply making too much money, taking too much risk, and showing too little concern about the crises then building. . . -p. 436: "It's no mean task to measure up to the high appraisal of my career that has been so generously expressed by Dr. Elliot McGucken. That he has, remarkably, placed my 2005 book, The Battle for the Soul of Capitalism, on the same reading list as The Odyssey--let alone the same planet!--adds even more to my burden in meeting the expectations of those who are aware of this background. . ." --Vanguard, Saga of Heroes, p. 469, Don't Count on It published 2010 by John Wiley & Sons
William Ferriss, former Chair of the National Endowment of the Arts (NEA): Many thanks for the impressive work that you are doing. I look forward to keeping in touch and commend you on the innovative teaching you do.
Jack Bogle: Your message to our nation's young students--a message of idealism and enlightenment--is a breath of fresh air that must--and will--find its way into the musty corridors of our colleges and business schools. Perhaps your happy acronym--CREATE (Center for Renaissance Entrepreneurship, Art, Technology, and Economics).will help. Keep up the good work! --John C. Bogle, Founder & Former CEO of the Vanguard Group
Bill Fay: It was my pleasure to join you and keynote the Hero's Odyssey Entrepreneurship Festival. The enthusiasm of the students was great to see. --William Fay, Founder/President of Production at Legendary Pictures (Batman, Superman, Inception, The Hangover, 300, The Patriot)
Dr. E was a mentor at hiphop entrepreneur Russell Simmons' The Race to Be. Mentor Elliot McGucken references that young entrepreneurs have just the same problems as the big studios re: piracy.
"Many heroes lived before Agamemnon, but they are all unmourned, and consigned to oblivion, because they had no bard to sing their praises." -Horace, Carmina, IV. 9. 25

"Fair dealing leads to greater profits in the end." --Homer's Odyssey
"The property which every man has in his own labour; as it is the original foundation of all other property, so it is the most sacred and inviolable. To hinder him from employing this strength and dexterity in what manner he thinks proper without injury to his neighbour is a plain violation of this most sacred property." --Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations
Join us at the
Second Annual Hero's Odyssey EntrepreneurshipTM Festival!

The HJE Festival seeks to give students, artists, and entrepreneurs the tools to make their passions their professions--to protect and profit from their creations--to take full ownership in their careers.

Dr. E's "Hero's Odyssey EntrepreneurshipTM" Podcast
@ IT Conversations
"Sometimes you've got to think like a surfer--lie low, go with the flow, and ride the wave. And sometimes you've got to be the cowboy--ride into town, call the bluff, and face the music in the showdown." Dr. Elliot McGucken explains how artists can find financial success by seeing their quest as a classic Hero's Odyssey (ala Joseph Campbell). By keeping the hero's goal of staying true to his art and passionately following the odyssey, the artist can turn his creative wealth into financial wealth.
First Annual
Hero's Odyssey EntrepreneurshipTM Festival

Dr. E's textbook coming soon!
A must read for every MFA, MBA, JD & DJ!
An FPS guide to generating true wealth by keeping the higher ideals over the bottom line in books, music, art, entertainment, video games, Hollywood, hedge funds, business, and life.
Available @ major bookstores in late 2009!

ROCKY RACCOON'S HIGH TECH HOLLYWOOD HIP HOP HEDGE FUND HOEDOWN & FASHION/ ART/ PHOTOGRAPHY SHOWDOWN: The Triangle's Premiere Artistic Entrepreneurship Networking Event
"If we are to go forward, we must go back and rediscover those precious values - that all reality hinges on moral foundations and that all reality has spiritual control." --Martin Luther King Jr.
"I long to accomplish a great and noble task, but it is my chief duty to accomplish humble tasks as though they were great and noble. The world is moved along, not only by the mighty shoves of its heroes, but also by the aggregate of the tiny pushes of each honest worker." --Helen Keller
Dr. E's original AE&T 101 class appears in Vaughan Penn's music video for Ready to Rise--directed by Dr. E. The song appeared on MTV's Laguna Beach and Grey's Anatomy, and it became the theme song for A&E's Roller Girls. & check out Artistic Entrepreneurship @ cincom and on market wire.
Welcome to Arts Entrepreneurship & Technology 101!! Dr. E is currently working on two books with all the wisdom gained in teaching the class and hosting Hero's Odyssey Entrepreneurship festivals in Carolina and California. The class represents a renaissance in a classical liberal arts education, and the books will seek to serve the reader with the greatest that has been spoken and written throughout the ages. The Enlightenment's classical ideals form the natural foundation for enduring free markets and the creation of long-term wealth via entrepreneurship--via rendering ideals real in living innovation and ventures.

Arts Entrepreneurship seeks to give students, artists, and entrepreneurs the tools to make their passions their professions--to protect and profit from their ideas--to take ownership in their careers and creations. For Adam Smith's invisible hand enriches all when happiness is pursued by artists and innovators--society's natural founts of wealth. Thomas Jefferson eloquently expressed the entrepreneurial premise:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. --The Declaration of Independence

The only clause in the main body of the United States Constitution that mentions "Rights" states the following:

The Congress shall have power to . . . promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries; --The United States Constitution

Couple these two passages together, and one has the moral premise of Artistic Entrepreneurship & Technology. Every student ought be given the tools to create new ventures--to protect their intellectual property, and to pursue and profit from their dreams on their "Hero's Odyssey" into entrepreneurship. For it is along that odyssey that the long-term "wealth of nations" is generated.

For students taking the class, the syllabus can be downloaded at the Heros' Odyssey Entrepreneurship site. And you can check out Dr. E's first lecture on Arts Entrepreneurship here: http://artsentrepreneurship.com/ae2.mov. Last year's high-tech TA was--Stefan Estrada: ssestrad*at*email.unc.edu. He loves helping artistic entrepreneurs out, so feel free to contact him!


Make your passion your profession.
R O C K   Y O U R   D R E A M S
Arts : Entrepreneurship : Business : Technology : Law
LAMP / XML / RDF / RSS / AJAX / PHP / MYSQL / PERL / HTML / SSL / XHTML / APACHE / DRM
'You've got to find what you love,' Steve Jobs says @ Stanford commencement.

From bittorrent, to Beethoven, to business
From NY to LA : From China to Carolina to California
From fashion magazines to social networks to record labels to indie film production.

Dylan & Scorsese rock it.
You can too.

American movies, television programs, music, books and computer software have surpassed traditional factory and agricultural products as our largest category of exports. --NCPA.ORG | Small business is America's most powerful engine of opportunity and economic growth. For millions of Americans, starting a business is the best opportunity to turn a dream into reality. --SBA.GOV | UNC's Artistic Entrepreneurship & Technology 101 brings it all together--you are the star of this class, and you will leave it closer to your dreams. --Dr. E

WELCOME WRITERS, ARTISTS, PROGRAMMERS, DJs, GAMERS, PRODUCERS, ENTERTAINMENT/IP LAWYERS, ACTORS, MBAs & ALL CREATORS!
My name is Dr. Elliot McGucken, and I've been teaching Artistic Entrepreneurship & Technology 101 in Carolina and California. The class is geared toward students with an interest in the arts, entrepreneurial ventures, and cutting-edge technology. This class is where the arts & sciences walk hand-in-hand, exalting classical free-market economics.
"The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead: his eyes are closed." --Albert Einstein

"MAKE MY AVOCATION MY VOCATION" --ROBERT FROST:
If you've ever thought of making your passion your profession, this class is for you. Just bring your passion, be it creative writing, painting, classical music, photography, hiphop, open source CMS & DRM, or movie production, and during the semester you will research the business structure and technological needs for launching your venture or career. From ecommerce to bricks & mortar art galleries, JD's & DJ's will rock out in new ventures. Diligent students will leave the class with their own record label, photo gallery, digital movie distribution system, or video for their band's new song.

The class looks forward to your group's final presentation on your startup movie/film production company, publishing house, modeling agency, fashion brand, professional photography studio/archive, high-tech hosting/bittorrent distribution venture, music-booking agency, nonprofit foundation for Baroque music, talent-management agency, or indie record label. This class is your chance to live your dream for a semester, and hopefully beyond!


Class mentor John C. Bogle on the importance of art! (PBS Bill Moyers Interview)

TELL YOUR VENTURE'S STORY:
The class's structure will be based on classical story elements as outlined in Aristotle's Poetics and Joseph Campbell's Hero With a Thousand Faces. The independent projects will be adventures akin to the "Hero's Odyssey," wherein students will become protagonists as artists and entrepreneurs attempting to realize their dream by launching a successful venture. Along the way students will encounter antagonists and pitfalls, but these shall be overcome by the end of the semester, when students will present their artistic ventures.

Anyone who has studied Hollywood knows that every blockbuster, from Lord of the Rings, to Star Wars, to The Matrix, is founded upon classical story structures, and the class will be taught in this classical context. The Declaration of Independence and Constitution are the two most fundamental business documents for artists and entrepreneurs, and students will be required to study the pertinent aspects of these classics. From Aristotle's Poetics to the Bill of Rights to 50 Cent's insights regarding the music business, students will be given the tools to venture forth in the contemporary context.

Technology's daily advance is fostering vast opportunities to create sustainable ventures in the arts. This class is just the beginning of the odyssey. Perhaps some students will venture up to NY or west to LA, or take advantage of the digital high definition (HD) technologies, bittorrent, open source CMS, and DRM to become tomorrow's writers, directors, producers, and record company executives right in Chapel Hill.

Every work of art tells a story, and behind that work of art is another parallel story--the business of its creation, promotion, and distribution. Such are the stories students will tell in Artistic Entrepreneurship & Technology 101.

BLOGGING THE VENTURE'S PROGRESS:
Students will be required to set up a blog which will serve as a log for independent projects, charting progress in pursuit of that distant shore. The blog will link to useful resources/articles regarding the venture, and will become a valuable asset for other groups in the class and beyond.

"GENIUS IS 1% INSPIRATION AND 99% PERSPIRATION" --THOMAS ALVA EDISON:
Artistic Entrepreneurship will be a lot of work, but the kind of exalted work that is rooted in a creative vision. As Edison said, genius is 1% inspiration and 99% perspiration, and as the class studies the careers of famous artists, entertainers, and entrepreneurs, students will see how much work, how much relentless, unyielding effort was devoted en route to achieving their dreams. A common theme will be just when it seems all is lost, a new day dawns.

The class will be a lot of fun too. The harder one works, the more fun it will be.

TEAMWORK: THE WHOLE IS GREATER THAN THE SUM OF ITS PARTS:
Students will work in self-selecting groups combining creative individuals across all disciplines, including artists, designers, writers, musicians, photographers, and programmers.

ARTS & TECHNOLOGY:
Steven Jobs never programmed, nor designed a microchip, and yet he's responsible for Apple, Pixar, the Macintosh, and the iPod. He lead and still leads hundreds of the best and brightest designers, programmers, and visonaries. Richard Branson never played an instrument nor piloted an airplane, and yet he's responsible for Virgin Airlines, Virgin Records, Virgin Mobile, and a ton of other companies. He too leads hundreds of the best and brightest.

All successful artistic ventures require a vision encompassing a wide array of talents, disciplines, and vocations, and this class will emphasize the teamwork that underlies all successful implementations of technology. Programmers and artists will work side-by-side in independent groups.

A theme of the class will be the social aspects of technology.

Modern artistic venture require huge respect for all professions, and students will work in groups combining writers, computer programmers, artists, marketers, business majors, and more.

Do you want to set up a record label? You will build it with cutting edge technology implemented by a CS major. Do you want to set up a non-profit center for classical music? You will research the business structure and write the business plan alongside a business major. Do you want to become an indie movie producer, bypassing Hollywood? You'll work alongside a busines major, a computer programmer, and a marketing/communications major.

BLOGGING REFLECTIONS ON REQUIRED READING:
Students will be required to read trade journals in the area of their passion. Publishing entrepreneurs will read Publisher's Weekly. Rising movie moguls will read The Hollywood Reporter and Variety.

Required reading for this class will include Aristotle's Poetics, iCon: The Biography of Steven Jobs, and Richard Branson's biography Losing My Virginity : How I've Survived, Had Fun, and Made a Fortune Doing Business My Way.

TELL YOUR VENTURE'S STORY:
During the semester you will tell a story. You are the hero entrepreneur in this odyssey, and your dreams are the destination.

Passion for the arts and entrepreneurship are the major prerequisites for this course, and we encourage all writers, filmmakers, poets, programmers, and musicians to apply! Within this class English majors will work with Physics majors to create new ventures.

Whatever your passion, Dr. E will guide you in devising a plan for pursuing it as a profession.

The course structure is based upon Aristotle's Poetics and Joseph Campbell's Hero with a Thousand Faces, which have inspired thousands of storytellers including George Lucas in the creation of Star Wars and the Wachowski Brothers in the creation of the Matrix.

Just like Neo and Luke Skywalker, all artists/entrepreneurs must look within for that magic creative inspiration. As the artist/entrepreneur, you are the hero protagonist in this course, and thus the story falls upon your shoulders as we progress through the semester. Success will be defined by the course taking you closer to your dreams in arts and entrepreneurship.

Artistic Entrepreneurship 101 Outline:
(Based on Joseph Campbell's classic Hero With a Thousand Faces)

Structure

The Monomyth is divided into three sections: Departure (sometimes called Separation), Initiation and Return.

This was laid out by Joseph Campbell in the first part of The Hero with a Thousand Faces, "The Adventure of the Hero." His thesis was that all myths follow this structure to at least some extent. To take three examples: the Christ story follows this structure almost exactly, whereas the Odyssey features frequent repetitions of the Initiation section and the Cinderella story follows this structure somewhat more loosely.

Departure deals with the hero venturing forth on his quest. Initiation deals with the hero's various adventures along his or her way. And Return deals with the hero's return home with knowledge and powers he or she has acquired along the way.

Departure (or Separation)

The Call to Adventure

The quest begins with the hero in a state of neurotic anguish. The quest is often announced to the hero by another character who acts as a 'herald'.

In Star Wars, Luke Skywalker, the hero, begins the story in frustration over being unable to leave home. The heralds are the two droids who carry a message from Princess Leia. In The Matrix, the call comes in the form of Morpheus and his followers who encourage the hero, Neo, to question reality. In The Lord of the Rings, Gandalf acts as the herald who gives Frodo his mission to destroy the One Ring. Aragorn, in a separate hero's odyssey, is told by Elrond of his true name and lineage as the Heir of Isildur and rightful heir to the throne of Gondor when he is 20 years of age.

Refusal of the Call

In many stories, the hero initially refuses the call to adventure. When this happens, the hero suffers somehow, and eventually chooses the quest.

In Star Wars, Luke is initially uninterested in helping the Rebel Alliance, preferring to stay on the farm; it is only when his foster parents are killed that he begins the quest. In The Matrix, Neo refuses to take the window washing equipment to escape and is captured by the Agents. In The Lord of the Rings, Frodo is reluctant to set out on an adventure. Because of his delay he is nearly captured by the Ringwraiths.

Supernatural Aid

Along the way, the hero often encounters a helper, usually a wise old man, who gives the hero both psychological and physical weapons.

In the Christ story, this role is filled by John the Baptist. In Star Wars, Luke encounters the Jedi Master Obi-wan Kenobi who presents Luke with a lightsaber and teaches him the Force. In The Lord of the Rings Frodo and Sam Gamgee receive help early in their odyssey from several figures, notably Tom Bombadil, Bilbo and Gandalf. Hannibal Lecter, in the The Silence of the Lambs gives Agent Starling many psychological weapons.

The Crossing of the First Threshold

The hero eventually must cross into a dark underworld, where he will face evil and darkness, and thereby find true enlightenment. Before this can occur, however, the hero must cross the threshold between his home world and the new world of adventure. Often this involves facing off against and quelling a 'threshold guardian'.

In Star Wars, the threshold is Mos Eisley, a spaceport that acts as a doorway between Luke's home planet and the wider universe; Luke must avoid capture by the threshold guardians, the imperial stormtroopers. In The Matrix, Neo takes the "red pill". In The Lord of the Rings, Frodo finally accepts his mission in Rivendell and crosses the threshold once he leaves there. Also in Rivendell, Aragorn meets Boromir who tells of the plight that Gondor is now in while at the same time confronting those present for not aiding Gondor; Aragorn sees that he must now save Gondor and claim the kingship. In The Odyssey, Odysseus must pass the island of the Sirens. In The Silence of the Lambs, Agent Starling must enter not only Lecter's hospital, guarded by the semen-flinging guardian, but also the second threshold of the sealed storage facility Lecter directs her to.

The Belly of the Whale

Having defeated the threshold guardian, the hero finds himself in a place of darkness where he begins his true adventure, perhaps discovering his true purpose. This 'belly of the whale' may be an ambiguous place of dream-like forms. The name for this stage of the monomyth is based upon the story of Jonah.

In Star Wars, it is the Death Star, in which Luke is engulfed and in which he learns how to be a hero. In The Lord of the Rings, the Fellowship pases through the abandoned mines of Moria. In The Matrix, Neo finds himself waking up in a bio-electric cell where he is one of the humans being harvested by the machines. In The Silence of the Lambs, Starling finds the serial killer Buffalo Bill's first victim within the dark, womblike storage facility.

Initiation

The Road of Trials

Once in the underworld, the hero is repeatedly challenged with mental and physical obstacles that must be overcome. Often these take the form of a test, by which the hero improves his skills and proves his worth.

In The Empire Strikes Back, Luke undergoes his training with Yoda. Aragorn, after the loss of Gandalf in Moria, must now take the position of leader of the Fellowship, and struggles to lead them as well as Gandalf wanted to. In The Silence of the Lambs, Starling must deal with sexism and her own fear while investigating Buffalo Bill.

The Meeting with the Goddess

After overcoming the Road of Trials, the hero often encounters a goddess-like woman: beautiful, queenlike or motherly. This is a grand reward for the hero.

In The Matrix Reloaded, Neo takes Trinity as a lover. In The Lord of the Rings, Frodo meets Galadriel, who shows him the future. Aragorn also meets Galadriel, who counsels him on his future actions. In The Silence of the Lambs, Buffalo Bill kidnaps a senator's daughter and the female senator initially appears as a benevolent, matriarchal force.

Temptation

However, the Goddess may also negate the hero's progress through lust or greed. This may distract the hero from his ultimate goal and plunge him back into darkness.

In The Matrix Reloaded, Persephone attempts to seduce Neo. In The Odyssey, the temptress is the nymph Calypso. In Star Wars, there is tension between Luke and Han Solo over their love for Princess Leia. Luke is also tempted by the dark side itself, as demonstrated by his vision in the cave on Dagobah. In The Lord of the Rings Frodo is tempted to give the Ring to Galadriel and forsake his mission. In the Christ story, Satan takes this role (though he would traditionally be considered a temptor, rather than a temptress). In The Silence of the Lambs, the offer of a reduced sentence for Hannibal Lecter, supposedely authorized by the senator, is revealed as a trick.

Atonement with the Father

The hero may encounter a father-like figure of patriarchal authority. 'Father' and 'son' are often pitted against each other for mastery of the universe. To understand the father, and ultimately himself, the hero must reconcile with this ultimate authority figure.

In The Empire Strikes Back, Luke confronts Darth Vader and learns that he is his father; in Return of the Jedi, he is reconciled with the reformed Vader. In The Matrix Reloaded, Neo meets The Architect, a program who identifies himself as the father of the Matrix. In The Lord of the Rings, Aragorn must face the legacy of his ancestor Isildur, by rising above the darkness where he failed. Aragorn directly faces this legacy most clearly when he decides to ride the Paths of the Dead and gain the allegiance of the Army of the Dead, a feat which only the true Heir of Isildur can perform. In The Silence of the Lambs, Starling comes to terms with the death of her father through Hannibal Lecter.

Apotheosis

The Hero's Ego is disintegrated in a breakthrough expansion of consciousness. Quite frequently their idea of reality is changed, they may find themselves able to do new things or able to see a larger point of view, allowing them to sacrifice themselves.

In The Empire Strikes Back, Luke sacrifices himself rather than turn to the dark side. In The Matrix Reloaded, Neo destroys several Sentinels in the real world using only his mind. Aragorn gains command of the immortal Army of the Dead, making his forces undefeatable. In The Silence of the Lambs after atonement, Starling gains knowledge from Lecter and must challenge Buffalo Bill on her own.

The Ultimate Boon

Having reconciled with the father and achieved personal enlightenment, the hero's psychological forces are again balanced. His new found knowledge, or boon, also has potential to benefit society.

In the Christ story, Jesus surrenders himself to the Romans, setting in motion his ultimate fate of crucifixion. In The Lord of the Rings, all of the hobbits gain wisdom and experience during their odyssey which allows them to easily set things right in the Shire on their return. By calling upon his heritage as the Heir of Isildur to take command of the Army of the Dead, Aragorn is now more in tune with his true nature and purpose as rightful heir to the throne of Gondor than ever before. In The Silence of the Lambs Starling graduates into an agent, her psychological forces balanced despite Lecter's escape.

Return

Refusal of the Return

Having found bliss and enlightenment in the underworld, the hero may not want to return with the boon.

In Revenge of the Sith, Anakin resists Padme's pleas to run away.

The Magic Flight

A mad dash is made by the hero to return with the prize.

In the Christ story, Jesus carries his cross to Golgotha. In The Matrix Revolutions, Neo takes a ship to the Machine City. In The Lord of the Rings Frodo and Sam are rescued from the slopes of Mt. Doom by Gandalf and the Eagles (which is also a "Rescue from Without"). Aragorn, after exiting the Paths of the Dead with his new invincible Shadow Army, must now make a mad dash across Gondor in a race against time to liberate the coast from an invasion of Corsairs, then lead the Southern army of Gondor north to save Minas Tirith from destruction, all in only six days.

Rescue from Without

The hero may need to be rescued from without by humanity.

In the Christ story, Judas betrays Jesus to the Romans. In The Matrix Revolutions, Trinity, Morpheus, and Seraph must rescue Neo from his imprisonment in the train station. In The Lord of the Rings, Frodo is ultimately unable to destroy the Ring without Gollum's unwilling help.

The Crossing of the Return Threshold

Before the hero can return to the real world, he must confront another threshold guardian. The first threshold was a symbolic death; this is now a symbolic rebirth.

In The Matrix Revolutions, Neo again confronts Smith. In Return of the Jedi, Luke again confronts Darth Vader. In The Lord of the Rings, the final threshold for the hobbits re-entering the Shire is guarded by Saruman and his Ruffians. For Aragorn, this means making a final confrontation with Sauron's forces in a suicidal attack on his massive army at the Black Gate.

Master of Two Worlds

Once the final threshold is crossed, the hero is now free to move back and forth between the two worlds at will. He has mastered the conflicting psychological forces of the mind.

In Return of the Jedi, Luke becomes a Jedi. In the Christ story, Jesus is resurrected. In The Lord of the Rings, Aragorn is crowned King of Gondor and Arnor, and has defeated Mordor (later re-destributing its conquered lands to the former slaves that tilled the fields in its southern regions). Aragorn then marries Arwen, daughter of his father-figure Elrond, uniting the worlds of Elf and Man. Finally, Aragorn finds a new sapling of the White Tree of Gondor, and Gandalf informs him that he is now leaving Middle-earth now that Sauron is defeated: Gandalf now officially "passes the torch" of responsiblity for protecting Middle-earth and its peoples from himself on to Aragon and his descendants.

Freedom to Live

With the odyssey now complete, the hero has found true freedom, and can turn his efforts to helping or teaching humanity.

In The Lord of the Rings, the hobbits become prominent citizens of the Shire with the wisdom they have gained. Aragorn reigns as King for many decades and ushers in a new age of peace and the rebuilding of Middle Earth. He then starts a family with Arwen, his Queen.

Creative Commons License
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Contact Dr. Elliot McGucken

Business Week online reports:

"From Beethoven to Bob Dylan
"Every artist is an entrepreneur." So argues Dr. Elliot McGucken, a visiting professor at Pepperdine University, in an online video introduction to his course, Art Entrepreneurship & Technology 101, which has the professor lecturing from the shore of a small lake. Among his suggestions for artists who want to be more entrepreneurial: launch a blog." -Business Week
ARTS ENTREPRENEURSHIP: HOW TO BE A HERO
by Mike Vargo

From The Kauffman Foundation's Thoughtbook

Elliot McGucken has an artful way of teaching entrepreneurship to artists. He explains the entrepreneurial process, for instance, by comparing it to the classic "hero's odyssey" in myths and epics. Typically, in the first stage of the story, the hero embarks on a quest that requires "separation" or "departure" from the familiar world (here McGucken finds strong parallels to the decision to start a company) -- and after many twists, the odyssey ends with the hero's "return" (exit strategy). "Every aspect of classical story, including antagonists, mentors, reversals of fortune, and the seizing of the sword from the stone, may be found in the realm of entrepreneurship," McGucken claims. And there's more. The college course he designed -- open to students in any major, working in any of the visual, literary or performing arts -- mixes classical concepts with cutting-edge practical advice, such as how to use open-source DRM (digital rights management) to keep the ogres from snatching your profits.

The course is called Artistic Entrepreneurship and Technology 101. First offered this past spring at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, with support from the Kauffman Campuses Initiative, it has drawn rave reviews from students. The core message of AE&T 101 is that "ideals are real," and in fact are practical: that you don't have to choose between being a starving artist or selling out. By starting a venture of your own that combines high artistic standards with sound business principles, you can "rock your dreams," McGucken tells students; he says that in the arts as in business, pursuing "fundamental value" pays off.

McGucken began his career in science. In the late 1990s he was a promising young physics researcher with a faculty position at Davidson College. But he wrote on the side and had long loved classical literature, from the Greeks to the great novelists. Feeling that these got too little attention nowadays he had launched a Web site, jollyroger.com, to host online forums about the Great Books and to offer his own commentary. And lo, the quest drew eyeballs. Before long, he says, "the advertising income from jollyroger was more than I was making from my professorship."

By the 2005-06 academic year McGucken was involved with several more arts-related Internet ventures while teaching physics part-time at UNC in Chapel Hill. There the Kauffman Campuses mission to teach entrepreneurship in all fields inspired his creation of the AE&T course, which immediately had the look of an idea whose time had come: more than 110 students applied for 40 seats.

Those chosen included undergrads from the liberal and fine arts, plus artistically oriented computer-science students, MBAs, and a law student. They combined their skills on projects, actually starting arts ventures or moving them along. Some showed up with ventures well under way, like Will Hackney, a freshman with over a dozen local bands signed to a record label he'd started in high school. Pierce Freelon, an African-American Studies major and member of a hip-hop duo called Language Arts, was branching into ventures ranging from a Web site on "blackademics" to the design of a hip-hop curriculum for K-12 schools.

And some were talented artists who hadn't yet turned entrepreneurial. Hannah Sink, a student filmmaker who had shot two documentaries in Thailand with grant funding, recalls: "I just had the idea that one day, maybe in fifteen or twenty years, I'd like to start my own production company. What I learned is that I can start taking the steps now. So for me this course was about homing in on a desire I already had, and learning the tangible things: forming an L.L.C., protecting your rights, using technology." During the course Sink and a colleague, Hope Blaylock, started Continuous Take Productions. The firm is still embryonic but the main thing, says Sink, is that "this is real. We know where we are in the process. If and when we take the next steps, we know what we have to do." Elliot McGucken, meanwhile, has carried AE&T 101 over to Pepperdine University, where he's a visiting professor for 2006-07. Replication and expansion of the course has thus begun, and McGucken has a larger reason for hoping the effort will grow. He sees much of today's cultural industry as being in a "decadent state," with big media firms giving us low-grade movies, books and other product even in the face of declining revenues: "When you put the bottom line above high ideals, both suffer," he says. But a new wave of artist/entrepreneurs -- armed with the skills to assert artistic control by starting and controlling businesses -- could help turn things around. "There's an opportunity," McGucken says, "for a cultural renaissance."


"The human soul, as Thomas Aquinas defined it, is the "form of the body," the vital power animating, pervading, and shaping an individual from the moment of conception, drawing all the energies of life into a unity.. In our temporal world, the soul of capitalism is the vital power that has animated, pervaded, and shaped our economic system, drawing all of its energies into a unity. In this sense, it is no overstatement to describe the effort we must make to return the system to its proud roots with these words: the battle to restore the soul of capitalism." --John C. Bogle, The Battle for The Soul of Capitalism

How one carries on in the face of unavoidable catastrophe is a matter of temperament. In high school, as was custom, I had chosen a verse by Virgil to be my motto: Tu ne cede malis sed contra audentior ito. Do not give in to evil, but proceed ever more boldly against it. I recalled these words during the darkest hours of the war. Again and again I had met with situations from which rational deliberation found no means of escape; but then the unexpected intervened, and with it came salvation. I would not lose courage even now. I wanted to do everything an economist could do. I would not tire in saying what I knew to be true. --Ludwig von Mises, Notes and Recollections, p. 70

Those fighting for free enterprise and free competition do not defend the interests of those rich today. They want a free hand left to unknown men who will be the entrepreneurs of tomorrow. --Ludwig Von Mises

The tragedy of collectivist thought is that, while it starts out to make reason supreme, it ends by destroying reason because it misconceives the process on which the growth of reason depends. It may indeed be said that it is the paradox of all collectivist doctrine and its demands for "conscious" control or "conscious" planning that they necessarily lead to the demand that the mind of some individual should rule supreme--while only the individualist approach to social phenomena makes us recognize the superindividual forces which guide the growth of reason. Individualism is thus an attitude of humility before this social process and of tolerance to other opinions and is the exact opposite of that intellectual hubris which is at the root of the demand for comprehensive direction of social purpose. --F.A. Hayek, The End of Truth, The Road to Serfdom

Let no one ignorant of geometry enter. --engraved on the door to Plato's Academy

The true work of art is but a shadow of the divine perfection. -- Michelangelo

Luck is not chance, it's toil; fortune's expensive smile is earned. --Emily Dickinson

"Even more significant of the inherent weakness of the collectivist theories is the extraordinary paradox that from the assertion that society is in some sense more than merely the aggregate of all individuals their adherents regularly pass by a sort of intellectual somersault to the thesis that in order that the coherence of this larger entity be safeguarded it must be subjected to conscious control, that is, to the control of what in the last resort must be an individual mind. It thus comes about that in practice it is regularly the theoretical collectivist who extols individual reason and demands that all forces of society be made subject to the direction of a single mastermind, while it is the individualist who recognizes the limitations of the powers of individual reason and consequently advocates freedom as a means for the fullest development of the powers of the interindividual process." --Nobel Laureate Economist F.A. Hayek

It is far more difficult to murder a phantom than a reality. --Virginia Woolf

Our peculiar security is in possession of a written Constitution. Let us not make it a blank paper by construction. --Thomas Jefferson

The most recent episode witnessed the culmination of an era in which our business corporations and our financial institutions, working in tacit harmony, corrupted the traditional nature of capitalism, shattering both confidence in the markets and the accumulated wealth of countless American families. Something went profoundly wrong, fundamentally and pervasively, in corporate America. . . . At the root of the problem, in the broadest sense, was a societal change aptly described by these words from the teacher Joseph Campbell: "In medieval times, as you approached the city, your eye was taken by the Cathedral. Today, it's the towers of commerce. It's business, business, business." We had become what Campbell called a bottom-line society. But our society came to measure the wrong bottom line: form over substance, prestige over virtue, money over achievement, charisma over character, the ephemeral over the enduring, even mammon over God. --The Battle for The Soul of Capitalism, by John C. Bogle

Friends of AE&T
Arts Entrepreneurship Educator's Network
Bijoy Goswami
Bootstrap Austin
Center for Entrepreneurship & The Law
Tech Coast Angels
Kauffman Foundation
Zaadz.com
Extreme Entrepreneurship Tour
AE Clubs!!
JOIN OUR FACEBOOK CLUB!!
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Myspace Group

contact drelliot@gmail.com
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Course Info.
Dr. E on facebook.
Artistic Entrepreneur- ship will be offered through the Business Administration department. Please contact Dr. Elliot McGucken with a brief statement summariz- ing your vision for an artistic venture or career in the arts and/or technology, and please include your student ID. I wish there were room for everyone, but space is limited. We'll be hosting events above and beyond the class, including a party in November featuring local bands, DJ's, films, art, and photography, so stay tuned! Feel free to contact me with any questions.
Arts / Tech
Slashdot
Arts & Letters
Hollywood Reporter
Arstechnica
GamaSutra
Variety
Reading/Books

















TRIANGLE ARTS
Chapel Hill and the surrounding Research Triangle are a hotbed of artistic entrepreneurship. This class will encourage you to contact all the local players in your field of interest.
DIY FOR INDY ARTISTS
Lulu
UNC
Memorial Hall
Playmakers
Department of Dramatic Arts
UNC Music
UNC Art
PHOTOGRAPHY
Pbase.com
VIDEO GAMES
EpicGames.com
FILM/MOVIES
Full Frame Festival
Hi Mom Film Fest
ART GALLERIES
MUSIC
The Cat's Cradle
Club 506
The Cave
Poll
What role will storytelling play in video games?

· A bigger role.
· A smaller role.
· It never has and never will play any role.
· Story doens't matter in Hollywood.

[ Results | Polls ]

Votes: 3
Comments: 11

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